Building Codes For Railing: A Simple Overview

building codes for railing

Building Codes For Railing: A Simple Overview

Building Codes for railing are important to ensure the safety of everyone who rides in these structures. Depending on the style of railings that you have, there may be different minimum lengths as well as spacing requirements. Some of the more common types of railings that need to meet building codes include: handrails, top and bottom, side and end, slanted and non-slanted rails, pole post and head rail, and flag rails. All of these materials have minimum required lengths, but you should also pay attention to any specific spacing requirements that may be needed with your particular construction.

Top and bottom rails are often referred to simply as a “threshold”, while slanted or non-slanted rails are often referred to as a “threshold stop.” threshold stops are typically longer than the bottom rail, while slanted or non-slanted thresholds are generally shorter than the top rail. This is because the width of the bottom rail needs to be at least 4 times the height of the threshold stop making it safe to ride on, as well as the distance between top and bottom rails. Building codes for railing for thresholds and for other structural details are outlined in the relevant regulations.

Baluster Spacing There are different spacing requirements for balusters on either handrails or railing sections. Generally, however, all balustrade spacing is done in accordance with building codes for handrails or the railing section being used. For balustrade spacing in the vertical (i.e., straight) direction, the minimum required spacing is half an inch. This corresponds to a distance of thirty inches between single posts or elights, as well as to a distance of twelve inches between double posts or crown joists.