Building Codes For Outdoor Decks – Read Them First

building codes for outdoor decks

Building Codes For Outdoor Decks – Read Them First

When a home owner decides to build a deck, patio, or sunroom onto his or her property, one of the first things they must do is to check with local building codes in order to ensure that their new structure meets all required standards. Many new structures made today have the potential to fall under the classification of “low-rise,” which means that the building has a relatively steep roof and few upper stories. These types of outdoor decks and patios are commonly known as “infill” structures, because essentially they are built up dirt and soil, rather than above grade.

In addition to these types of infill outdoor decks, there are also many other building codes that must be followed in order to build an outdoor structure that is safe and meets all local ordinances. Many cities and towns have what are known as building permit codes, which outline the exact measurements and specifications that must be met in order to construct a structure on a property. Often times, these building codes can differ from city to city and sometimes even from county to county, so it is vital that an experienced professional to be brought in to inspect a project before any money is invested. This is true regardless of whether a deck, outdoor pool, or sunroom will be located on a residential property or a commercial one. While there may be general building codes for outdoor decks that pertain to residences, many areas have their own unique codes that must be followed.

When it comes to the building codes for outdoor decks, there are many local officials and government agencies that will walk you through the process step by step. However, if you are building a structure such as a sunroom, outdoor pool, or swing set, it is important to have the necessary building permits in order to gain construction rights to the land you plan on using. In many cases, these permits can be acquired without any fees being charged, but if this is not possible, then professional fees will need to be incurred. With today’s economy, building codes for outdoor decks are being reevaluated by many government offices in an effort to streamline construction and minimize regulations that could otherwise become a hassle.